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‘God makes no mistakes’: Teens write about the value of human life

‘God makes no mistakes’: Teens write about the value of human life

News briefs for January 2017

News briefs for January 2017

Obispos cubanos 'preocupados' por fin de "pies secos / pies mojados"

Obispos cubanos 'preocupados' por fin de "pies secos / pies mojados"

At Mass with Filipinos celebrating Santo Niño de Cebu

At Mass with Filipinos celebrating Santo Niño de Cebu

En Misa con la Liga Orante

En Misa con la Liga Orante

Archbishop’s Motorcycle Ride

Archbishop’s Motorcycle Ride

President Obama ends Wet Foot/Dry Foot policy towards Cuban arrivals

President Obama ends Wet Foot/Dry Foot policy towards Cuban arrivals

Colors of diversity on display at annual Migration Mass

Colors of diversity on display at annual Migration Mass

Cath·o·hól·ic

Fr. Michael W. Davis

Little Flower Church

2nd Sunday of Ordinary Time : January 15, 2017

Dear Parish Family,

I have always been “taken” by the notion of the missionary work of the Church. As I grew up in rural Ohio, a place, itself, where the seeds of the faith were planted by missionary priests traveling from farmland to farmland and county to county on horseback, it was not uncommon that missionary priests would visit our parish, telling us of the important work of spreading the Gospel, even in foreign lands. How often we heard of priests, religious, and lay missionaries from the United States leaving home and nation to travel overseas to labor on behalf of the Gospel. They demonstrated exemplary zeal for the Kingdom of God, leaving everything that was familiar, and seeking to give convincing testimony to the person and mission of Jesus Christ. I was always impressed by their stories, courage, and witness.

When I was in college seminary, I was so “taken” by the notion of missionary work and the needs of the Church that, one summer, I decided to embark upon a trip to Mexico, involving myself in ministry in a desert mission there, using the little bit of Spanish that I had learned by that time in my life, play my guitar and sing the songs of culture and of the Gospel, sharing whatever I had available, so as to demonstrate and testify to my youthful faith in Christ. I didn’t know what I could accomplish, but I was willing to give what I had in witness to Jesus. I quickly came to know how ministry which transcends language and culture is at the heart of the mission of the Church.

To my surprise, upon my return from that missionary trip, I made a momentous decision. I chose to select as my college major the area of Spanish and Latin American studies, and seek to affiliate with a diocese in our own country where multi-lingual/multi-cultural ministry was needed. The seminary I had attended once served German immigrants to our nation. Now, in a visionary way, it encouraged us German-Americans to capture some of that missionary zeal for the next wave of valued immigrants to our land: the growing Latin American presence in the United States. Although priests are needed throughout the entire country, including my own native Ohio, I soon visited dioceses in Texas. I also visited the Archdiocese of Miami. I was amazed to discover that in our own country, yes even to this day, there are territories that are considered “home missions.” So many dioceses in the south have long-relied on missionary priests from other countries and, yes, even other states, to plant the seeds of the Gospel. Somehow that ministry always appealed to me. Service in the adventure of the Gospel takes us many places. Though always missing the familiarity of my own culture and family, for twenty-seven years I have not been able to resist the ongoing need to be a missionary disciple, and to testify to the Gospel across linguistic and cultural lines. The Church in my estimation would cease to be true to its essence without such missionary zeal alive in the hearts of its people, seeking to plant the seeds of the Gospel, and pass on the faith to the next generation. A true missionary makes himself available. A true missionary responds to what comes. It all has to do with giving testimony to the person and work of Christ. It’s a calling that we all share in our own sphere of influence.

With John the Baptist, I can truly say that “I have seen and testified,” as best as I know how, to the Lord. While none of us enjoy the perfection of heavenly bliss, I believe that convictional witnessing and work on behalf of the living Gospel is the invitation that all members of the contemporary Church share. We are each called to see the presence of God, and to give testimony to the action of God in our midst. We are each invited to be missionary disciples, sharing the journey of faith with one another, and inviting others to come along for the journey as well. May missionary zeal for the work and person of Christ Jesus overflow in you, as you heed the call to be missionary disciples today and everyday.

Fr. Michael W. Davis
Pastor

III. The mystery of the universe

January 15, 2017

76. In the Judaeo-Christian tradition, the word “creation” has a broader meaning than “nature”, for it has to do with God’s loving plan in which every creature has its own value and significance. Nature is usually seen as a system which can be studied, understood and controlled, whereas creation can only be understood as a gift from the outstretched hand of the Father of all, and as a reality illuminated by the love which calls us together into universal communion.

Source : Laudato Si’

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