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‘You can feel the presence of the Holy Spirit and Jesus’

‘You can feel the presence of the Holy Spirit and Jesus’

Celebrating the ‘Marist spirit’, family style

Celebrating the ‘Marist spirit’, family style

At Mass at CRS Board meeting in Baltimore, MD

At Mass at CRS Board meeting in Baltimore, MD

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Lent: a time of spiritual battle

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Respect life office back in Miami Gardens

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St. John Paul II, pray for us

Over 200 priests to join Archbishop Wenski for 2017 Chrism Mass

Over 200 priests to join Archbishop Wenski for 2017 Chrism Mass

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Holy Triduum with Archbishop Wenski

Archbishop Thomas Wenski to celebrate Palm Sunday Mass

Archbishop Thomas Wenski to celebrate Palm Sunday Mass

U.S. Bishops release video to help immigrants know their rights

U.S. Bishops release video to help immigrants know their rights

Cath·o·hól·ic

Fr. Bob Tywoniak

Blessed Sacrament Parish

Fourth Sunday of Lent : March 26, 2017

The Lord is My Shepherd; There Is Nothing I Shall Want.

Once again, as in the previous week, the psalm (23) connects to the first reading.

During Lent, all the first readings work together. They show how God prepares the human race for salvation. Preparation for salvation happens step-by-step through the generations of people that follow. The life and work of King David, who is responsible for today’s psalm’s motivation, is one of the steps toward the people’s preparation for salvation.

Psalm 23 gives the idyllic picture of the shepherd caring for his peaceful sheep. The earthly shepherd, however, recognizes his shepherd. The one true great shepherd is God. In psalm 23 David, as shepherd, recognizes THE shepherd: “THE Lord is my shepherd; He guides me in right paths for His name’s sake; You (God) spread the table before me; I shall dwell in the house of the Lord….”

Saint Paul says, in the second reading, “Try to learn what is pleasing to God.” Sheep listen to their shepherd’s voice. They know it and obey.

In the first reading, 1 Samuel, we discover a true shepherd may be different from one we might choose. Samuel must depend on God to select the proper one.

The Gospel shows how those who think themselves the people’s shepherds are mistaken. They do not see clearly. Nevertheless, they protest that they do. The man born blind, however, comes to recognize Jesus as the shepherd.

Jesus dispels the notion a physical challenge such as blindness is caused merely by a person’s sin, as if God punishes one in such a way. Jesus cures the man. As the elite men try to discredit Jesus the former blind man asks how it could be Jesus was against God if he were able to cure blindness. The story shows the Good that is taking place. This is an example of when Jesus goes beyond the Law when a person’s dignity is involved.

The opponents continue to question the man. He responds by saying, “I told you already and you did not listen.” This evokes an important matter for reflection.

Both as sheep and shepherds we must ask if we listen to God. Do we submit to the Lord thus discerning the most holy way to go in life? Sometimes we keep asking the same questions expecting a different answer. That is, we expect to hear an answer we have predetermined. Yet, the predetermined answer is not the correct one. The danger is we might submit to a false shepherd who tells us what we want to hear. The false shepherd can take advantage and manipulate us to a bad end.

Thus, be alert. Know the Scripture, Tradition and Magisterium of the Church well. Submit to God’s revelation that we may recognize the true shepherd.

Fr. Bob Tywoniak
Pastor

No creature is self-sufficient

March 26, 2017

86. The universe as a whole, in all its manifold relationships, shows forth the inexhaustible riches of God. Saint Thomas Aquinas wisely noted that multiplicity and variety “come from the intention of the first agent” who willed that “what was wanting to one in the representation of the divine goodness might be supplied by another,” inasmuch as God’s goodness “could not be represented fittingly by any one creature.” Hence we need to grasp the variety of things in their multiple relationships. We understand better the importance and meaning of each creature if we contemplate it within the entirety of God’s plan. As the Catechism teaches: “God wills the interdependence of creatures. The sun and the moon, the cedar and the little flower, the eagle and the sparrow: the spectacle of their countless diversities and inequalities tells us that no creature is self-sufficient. Creatures exist only in dependence on each other, to complete each other, in the service of each other.” (Catechism #340)

Source : Laudato Si'

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