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At Mass during the Men's conference at St. Mark Church

At Mass during the Men's conference at St. Mark Church

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Over 200 priests to join Archbishop Wenski for 2017 Chrism Mass

Over 200 priests to join Archbishop Wenski for 2017 Chrism Mass

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Holy Triduum with Archbishop Wenski

News briefs for March 2017

News briefs for March 2017

Archbishop Thomas Wenski to celebrate Palm Sunday Mass

Archbishop Thomas Wenski to celebrate Palm Sunday Mass

U.S. Bishops release video to help immigrants know their rights

U.S. Bishops release video to help immigrants know their rights

Cath·o·hól·ic

Fr. Bob Tywoniak

Blessed Sacrament Parish

Fourth Sunday of Lent : March 26, 2017

The Lord is My Shepherd; There Is Nothing I Shall Want.

Once again, as in the previous week, the psalm (23) connects to the first reading.

During Lent, all the first readings work together. They show how God prepares the human race for salvation. Preparation for salvation happens step-by-step through the generations of people that follow. The life and work of King David, who is responsible for today’s psalm’s motivation, is one of the steps toward the people’s preparation for salvation.

Psalm 23 gives the idyllic picture of the shepherd caring for his peaceful sheep. The earthly shepherd, however, recognizes his shepherd. The one true great shepherd is God. In psalm 23 David, as shepherd, recognizes THE shepherd: “THE Lord is my shepherd; He guides me in right paths for His name’s sake; You (God) spread the table before me; I shall dwell in the house of the Lord….”

Saint Paul says, in the second reading, “Try to learn what is pleasing to God.” Sheep listen to their shepherd’s voice. They know it and obey.

In the first reading, 1 Samuel, we discover a true shepherd may be different from one we might choose. Samuel must depend on God to select the proper one.

The Gospel shows how those who think themselves the people’s shepherds are mistaken. They do not see clearly. Nevertheless, they protest that they do. The man born blind, however, comes to recognize Jesus as the shepherd.

Jesus dispels the notion a physical challenge such as blindness is caused merely by a person’s sin, as if God punishes one in such a way. Jesus cures the man. As the elite men try to discredit Jesus the former blind man asks how it could be Jesus was against God if he were able to cure blindness. The story shows the Good that is taking place. This is an example of when Jesus goes beyond the Law when a person’s dignity is involved.

The opponents continue to question the man. He responds by saying, “I told you already and you did not listen.” This evokes an important matter for reflection.

Both as sheep and shepherds we must ask if we listen to God. Do we submit to the Lord thus discerning the most holy way to go in life? Sometimes we keep asking the same questions expecting a different answer. That is, we expect to hear an answer we have predetermined. Yet, the predetermined answer is not the correct one. The danger is we might submit to a false shepherd who tells us what we want to hear. The false shepherd can take advantage and manipulate us to a bad end.

Thus, be alert. Know the Scripture, Tradition and Magisterium of the Church well. Submit to God’s revelation that we may recognize the true shepherd.

Fr. Bob Tywoniak
Pastor

God has written a precious book

March 19, 2017

85. God has written a precious book, “whose letters are the multitude of created things present in the universe”. (John Paul II, Catechesis, Jan. 30, 2002) The Canadian bishops rightly pointed out that no creature is excluded from this manifestation of God: “From panoramic vistas to the tiniest living form, nature is a constant source of wonder and awe. It is also a continuing revelation of the divine.” (Pastoral letter: You Love All that Exists) The bishops of Japan, for their part, made a thought-provoking observation: “To sense each creature singing the hymn of its existence is to live joyfully in God’s love and hope.” (Message: Reverence for Life) This contemplation of creation allows us to discover in each thing a teaching which God wishes to hand on to us, since “for the believer, to contemplate creation is to hear a message, to listen to a paradoxical and silent voice.” (John Paul II, Catechesis, Jan. 26, 2000) We can say that “alongside revelation properly so-called, contained in sacred Scripture, there is a divine manifestation in the blaze of the sun and the fall of night.” (John Paul II, Catechesis, Aug. 2, 2000) Paying attention to this manifestation, we learn to see ourselves in relation to all other creatures: “I express myself in expressing the world; in my effort to decipher the sacredness of the world, I explore my own.” (Paul Ricoeur: Philosophie de la Volonté)

Source : Laudato Si'

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